Mapping Crime

Crime is an inevitable part of life in a city. While Georgetown is blessed with a lower violent crime rate than most DC neighborhoods, its reputation as a home to hundreds of retail stores and many well-heeled residents means that Georgetown is subject to a somewhat constant stream of property crimes, with the occasional mugging.

But besides reading the daily round-up from MPD 2D, how else can a resident get a quick idea what sort of crime lurks in Georgetown’s shadows? Crime maps can give you a pretty quick idea of the what, where, when and how of crime. There are a couple options out there and GM reviews them after the break:

The Not So Good:

MPD's Crime Map for PSA 206

The MPD publishes it’s own crime map at crimemap.dc.gov. Like most crime maps, it allows you to select a geographic area, either an address, zip code or PSA (Georgetown’s is 206). Additionally, it allows you to chose a date range and sort the crimes by types. However, MPD’s crime map is based on a map platform far inferior to Google Maps (it feels like MapQuest circa 1999) and more damning, it doesn’t give you any information on each specific crime. This severely limits the usefulness of the map.

The Better:

CAG Crime Map

The Citizen’s Association of Georgetown recently released their own crime map designed by Gianluca “Luca” Pivato. Like the MPD map, it enables you to sort by date, crime, and location but it’s miles ahead of the MPD map in that it’s based on Google Maps.  Furthermore, you can click on each incident and get the basic information. Unfortunately you cannot get a narrative description of the event. It only tells you the date and time and category of the crime. 

The Best:

Crime Map Dc Crime Map

CrimeinDC.org offers the best crime map for DC. It offers all the basic features of MPD’s and CAG’s crime maps, it’s based on Google maps and best of all, it provides narrative descriptions for each crime. These are simply the sentence or two descriptions that the MPD offers in its daily digest, but it’s only CrimeinDC.org that put it all together. The only drawback to this map is that it can only show 40 incidences at a time, so if you select too long of a time period, you may not get a good visual representation of all the crime. Thus, for this tool to be most useful, you ought to select a specific time period. One more feature that this crime map offers over CAG’s is that it provides data for the rest of the city.

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4 Comments

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4 responses to “Mapping Crime

  1. Pingback: MPD No Longer Providing Daily Crime Summaries «

  2. There’s also EveryBlock: http://dc.everyblock.com/crime/

    Disclaimer: I run the site, so I have an obvious bias. :-)

    We let you sort the DC crimes in all sorts of ways — by offense (theft, robbery), by method (robbery w/ gun vs. robbery w/ knife), by date, by time of day and geography. You can type in your address to view crime near you, or you can type in a neighborhood to get data on a broader level.

    We have our own maps, which work like Google Maps (with dynamic panning/dragging) but have a more muted color scheme, which makes the maps much more appropriate for data visualization.

    And we offer daily e-mail alerts for every city block in DC (not just Georgetown) that tell you the crime that’s been reported recently, plus a slew of other local news and information that we update every day. For example, we’ll notify you any time the Post writes about something in your neighborhood, whether it’s crime or otherwise. (You can see the full list of information that we publish here: http://dc.everyblock.com/news/ )

    Adrian @ EveryBlock

  3. Pingback: MPD Daily Crime Summaries Replaced With Less Informative Map Feed «

  4. Pingback: Vox Populi » The new blog on the block is Georgetown Metropolitan

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