Ghosts of Buildings Past

On Monday, GM posted an article showing how the waterfront has changed since 1918. One element of the old photo that GM found particularly interesting was the line of buildings along Canal Rd. and Prospect St. south of GU:

From another old GM post, you can trace back through the Library of Congress to find the survey records from 1920, which show these properties:

All these buildings are long gone, but what’s really interesting (at least to GM) is that if you look at the DC zoning map, like the one at the top of this post, you can see that these buildings (at least the ones along Prospect) are still legal lots despite the fact that its owned by NPS and is just a hillside of trees.

This isn’t the only spot where the ghosts of buildings long gone still float around. Along the waterfront, the old warehouses and boathouses still leave their mark:

And perhaps GM’s favorite ghost is the Glen Echo trolley right of way:

GM likes to point out that most of the old trolley path is still owned by the city. Should DDOT run out of places to put new streetcar lines, maybe it ought to rebuild the old 20 line?

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1 Comment

Filed under History

One response to “Ghosts of Buildings Past

  1. Nemo

    The cost of rebuilding all the bridges along the Glen Echo route would be very high, not to mention the fact that Palisades residents would go NIMBY-ballistic at the prospect of an active trolley line (I guess “light rail” is the fashionable nom du jour for street cars) in their neighborhood. The solution might be a bike/hike trail — what a GREAT pleasure it would be to walk or peddle along the Palisades from Glen Echo to Georgetown, passing through that wonderfully funky old street car suburb and the occasional patch of woods or parkland, enhanced by lovely prospects of the mighty Cohongorotan, flowing below, unvexed, to the sea. Add some benches and overlooks at the most scenic spots — what more do we need to complete the circle of our felicities? A Georgetown-Glen Echo hike/bike trail would be an excellent project on which to spend District funds, combining, as it does, both utliity and public delight! Let’s get started!,

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